No Justice No Beets

thebrooklynink:

Sonny and Joe’s hummus — Until a resolution, it’s off the shelves at Gracefully Supermarket in Midtown. Rebecca Ellis / The Brooklyn Ink

The basics of kosher law govern the facility, where no meat products or utensils were seen together with the dairy products, the cheeses stored in a separate area of the warehouse.

But as strictly as Flaum follows the biblical laws, federal officials say Flaum is hardly kosher when it comes to adhering to labor law.

Moshe Grunhut and his kosher food distribution company, Flaum Appetizing Corp., have been at the center of a complex and high profile controversy about employment law involving major union organizers and advocates in two federal cases. In the first most widely publicized case, former kitchen workers, represented by the Industrial Workers of the World, allege that the company violated the National Labor Relations Act for discouraging its employees from organizing a union and firing them after doing so. The Industrial Workers of the World, a labor union, and Brandworkers International, a labor law non-profit, is representing 17 workers after they were fired during a union organizing drive.

After the labor board ordered Flaum on Aug. 6, 2009 to pay at least  $230,000 in damages to the workers, Flaum filed a countersuit alleging that the employees in questions were all illegal aliens and could therefore not organize a union, let alone be entitled to back pay or reinstatement. 

Read more on Rebecca’s Stumblr

No Justice No Beets

The basics of kosher law govern the facility, where no meat products or utensils were seen together with the dairy products, the cheeses stored in a separate area of the warehouse.

But as strictly as Flaum follows the biblical laws, federal officials say Flaum is hardly kosher when it comes to adhering to labor law.

Moshe Grunhut and his kosher food distribution company, Flaum Appetizing Corp., have been at the center of a complex and high profile controversy about employment law involving major union organizers and advocates in two federal cases. In the first most widely publicized case, former kitchen workers, represented by the Industrial Workers of the World, allege that the company violated the National Labor Relations Act for discouraging its employees from organizing a union and firing them after doing so. The Industrial Workers of the World, a labor union, and Brandworkers International, a labor law non-profit, is representing 17 workers after they were fired during a union organizing drive. After the labor board ordered Flaum on Aug. 6, 2009 to pay at least  $230,000 in damages to the workers, Flaum filed a countersuit alleging that the employees in questions were all illegal aliens and could therefore not organize a union, let alone be entitled to back pay or reinstatement. 

Read more on Rebecca’s Stumblr

Soft Porn, Hardening Hearts: A Magazine’s Private Story

This longread was originally published on Jan. 2, 2012 on The Brooklyn Ink

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By Jonathan Tayler

The speck bothered Danielle Leder. It had to go.

It was nothing more than a small piece of dead skin, or perhaps a stray bit of dust, but against her model’s bright red lips, the mote could not stay. That was all the more apparent on the screen of the expensive high-definition video camera that Leder had acquired for the video shoot. The small brownish spot stood out amidst the sea of red lipstick and pale white skin.

Her crew of four had tried what they could to get the speck off without having to remove or smudge the model’s makeup. Finally, Leder got up, took her model’s hand and led her to the back of the studio, to the lit mirrors and swivel chairs that served as a dressing room.

“Come on,” said the 25-year-old Leder. “I want to get it right.”

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The Life and Death of Army Spec. Kevin O. Hill

This longread was originally published on Oct. 15, 2009 on The Brooklyn Ink

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By Terry Baynes

The News

The minute Oslen Hill saw the uniforms at his door, he knew.  He had served in the military.  No words were necessary.  His son, Kevin O. Hill, was dead.  He was a 23-year-old soldier from Brooklyn deployed in Afghanistan.

Soon after the officers left, the phone started ringing in Oslen Hill’s home in Raleigh, North Carolina.  He picked it up to hear his wife, Mahalia Hill, screaming on the other end.  Two officers had also come to her door, in East New York, Brooklyn.  Two synchronized knocks five hundred miles apart; the same news.

Hill tried to call his daughters, Chinyere and Shantel, but he couldn’t reach them.  They had gone out shopping that Sunday and hadn’t heard the news yet.  On the bus ride back, his oldest daughter, Chinyere, called.  “The way I answered the phone, my voice, she knew that something was wrong,” he said.  “Having to tell her on the phone, and not being able to hold her.  And to hear them scream, without being able to hold them.  That just made it even worse.”

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